Village Tour

History

Architecture

Village Directory

Community Events
HEF Calendar

Zoning Board

Historic Elsah Foundation

   About HEF

   Foundation Officers

   Membership Application

   Farley’s Music Hall

Business Directory

Plat and Flood Maps
Carli Archives

 

 




 

 

Guided tours of Principia College and/or the Village of Elsah are provided by the Historic Elsah Foundation. For more information or to arrange a tour, please email us at historicelsah@gmail.com or call Jane Pfeifer 618 374 1565.


Lecture
Thursday, November 20, 2014
7:30 pm
Farley's Music Hall, 37 Mill Street
 

 
Well known aquatic ecologist Richard Sparks will be the featured speaker in the popular Hosmer-Williams Lecture Series sponsored by the Historic Elsah Foundation. The lecture, entitled What Makes A River Great, is about the Mississippi River. Sparks will cover how this river is home to ancient lineages of fishes that have seen the dinosaurs and the glaciers come and go and a continental flyway for millions of migratory birds in spring and fall. Also covered will be how the Mississippi also serves as a method of transportation, a source of drinking water for our river cities.

Learn more ...


Historic Elsah, Illinois

American towns change almost as fast as American fashions. When something of the old remains in this dynamic society it is, of course, usually a building. But most old buildings stand isolated and strange amid modernity, and tell no more of the past than a stranded whale tells of the open ocean.

 

Occasionally, though, one finds a town in which the prevailing flavor is of the past.  Elsah is such a town. Almost all of a piece, it gives us a strong hint of the setting of nineteenth century life along the river. In some ways, because of the passing of home industries and the fact that Elsah's once active waterfront now lies beneath the McAdams Highway, the town today is quieter than it once must have been. Mills, warehouses, river shipping, two railroads, numerous local businesses, and throngs of farmers during the wheat shipping season all have disappeared. But many of the houses and commercial buildings remain, and it is they which make coming to Elsah like stepping back in time.

 

People are generally fascinated with such places, perhaps because they discover a side of themselves that existed before they did, a society built on different dimensions, living at a slower speed, with forgotten crafts, using similar materials, suggesting lives lived in valid ways we no longer know.”

 

Excerpt from page 4:

Elsah: A Historic Guidebook

by Charles B. Hosmer, Jr. and Paul O. Williams,
Elsah: Historic Elsah Foundation, 1986

 



Elsah Historic Foundation    

PO Box 117 Elsah, IL 62028     Phone 618.374.1059     Fax 618.374.1565     historicelsah@gmail.com